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Combative Pistol, Part 2

By Ian Strimbeck

01/04/2018

In part one of this article, I talked initially about looking at the pistol draw stroke more combatively and less about aiming for the fastest time on the clock. The following information will revolve around the continuation of the draw stroke as the pistol breaks from the vertical line of presentation and moves into the horizontal line of presentation from my perspective, as well as with heavy influence from my mentor Craig Douglas of Shivworks.

The #3 & #4 Position

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The #3 position is straight and consistent across the board whether carrying strong side or appendix. Once we break from the #2 position in the vertical line of presentation, the #3 position is where we first visually reference the gun in the horizontal line of presentation. As I talked about previously, we need to think of the range being in a constant flux at where we can viably shoot our pistol from. If under a watchful eye of a reputable educator of this draw stroke method, the user should be able to get decent hits on the target in the center chest from the #3 position. Your pistol should be high and compressed in between your pecs but still be visually referenced in the bottom edge (foveal cone) of your vision. Although, we need to have enough offset from our chest that the slide can reciprocate properly. It’s a “happy medium” that definitely takes practice at first under a trained eye. The biggest issue with this position in the draw stroke is developing a consistent position each and every time. In the #2 position we’re solely relying on kinesthetics as we may not be able to see the gun. In the #3 we are visually referencing the gun, however we do not obviously have the traditional notch and blade sight picture as we are used to. Due to that we need to be aware of strange steering issues that can develop from simply dropping our shoulders or elbows which can affect the height of our impact zones, to our wrists being off canter that will affect left or right impact zones. Regardless the #3 is an often overlooked viable shooting position, especially if clearing out close quarters such as hallways, vehicles, doorways, attics, etc. It can also be used when breaking contact to extension or having to compress the gun if our target is crashing back into us.

We need to be aware of strange steering issues that can develop from simply dropping our shoulders or elbows which can affect the height of our impact zones.

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The #4 position is simply appropriate extension relative to the target. This is hopefully where we’ve broken contact from the target enough that we can utilize the pistol at distance in order to attain proper sight alignment/sight picture. The counter to this is we may have driven the pistol out immediately to the #4 position to get a few shots in but now we may be moving towards a doorway where there is unknown space, or the threat is now collapsing into us. The #4 position could also be just shallow of full extension. Just like any other step in this draw stroke, the position the pistol is in relates directly to the distance between you and the target. You may have broken from the #3 position and are now on your way to #4, but he may be crashing back into you so your pistol may not have gotten to full extension yet. Throughout positions #2-#4, you should be able to continually put rounds into the target. Either way intellectually understand that the use of a pistol combatively is in a constant flow of compression or extension due to the threat/environment we’re presented with.

Tying the Draw Stroke Together

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Whether we’re drawing our pistol while entangled or have to draw to full extension and have to compress the gun, we need to understand that practicing these techniques under a dedicated educator is extremely important. This style of draw stroke is a perishable skill and is relatively non-existent to replicate in real time without proper training. The location, places and areas you may have to draw your pistol from can be varied and unpredictable outside the safety of your local shooting range. By having an adaptable and dependable draw stroke we give ourselves options to first and foremost keep the pistol under our control, but also get effective rounds on target in an expedient fashion. The final article in this series will deal with the when, why, and how of integrating two forms of fending techniques with your off-hand as well as the often overlooked method of reholstering, which if done properly will negate any flagging of yourself or others.

The location, places and areas you may have to draw your pistol from can be varied and unpredictable outside the safety of your local shooting range.

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Article By Ian Strimbeck
Hand-to-Hand, Grappling, Edged Weapons
I am constantly evolving how I teach so as to bring the best knowledge to my students which will therefore allow them to be better able to answer the call if violence is the only option.

Comments

EccoDDwolf
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Fantastic information. Keep up the good work guys.
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Mulley
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Absolutley love these articles
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