Unentangled Bladework PT. 1

By Ian Strimbeck

05/19/2018

This article is going to focus specifically on the tactics, techniques and procedures surrounding the use of a defensive blade while unentangled. This is a rabbit hole that can go extremely deep, but the goal of this piece is to understand robust and simple movements that will allow the practitioner to survive. In 2017, knife dueling is few and far between in developed first world countries. The majority of knife assaults occur within two arms reach and the victim initially not even knowing they’ve been stabbed. This is where the “fight” usually starts, from some type of entanglement. The goal for any type of knife problem is to hopefully work the opponent off of you and then at distance keep him off of you. The last thing you want to do is go through all the work of getting unentangled and have them crash back into you to get re-entangled all over again.

The majority of knife assaults occur within two arms reach and the victim initially not even knowing they’ve been stabbed.

Stance


You should be thinking about positioning yourself to the target in a similar fashion to a modern boxer. Your hips should be squared up and your feet spread shoulder width apart in order to displace your weight properly. With that being said your “lead” foot should coincide directly with what hand is holding your blade. For example if you’re right hand dominate, a traditional boxing stance would mean your right foot would be moved back to facilitate cross punches while your left hand would be stepped forward for jabs and crosses. With this new technique, everything would be the opposite. The reasoning for this is to allow a much larger reach with your knife hand. With unentangled blade work, you want to keep as much distance between you and the adversary as possible. Your opposing hand should be up and protecting your face, just as you would if boxing. The shoulders should be up and shrugged to again protect the neck but also to hopefully prevent any over-rotation of the head from incoming blows.

The reasoning for this is to allow a much larger reach with your knife hand.

Blade Indexing


Whether utilizing the blade in a forward or reverse grip, you should have a consistent location when you’re not throwing knife jabs at the threat. With a forward grip, your arm is retracted and next to your rib cage with the point of the blade indexed on the threat. In this setup your arm is already recoiled and ready to strike with a quality, powerful blow. This also places the blade in a position where you can retain and have complete control over it. In the reverse grip, you want to position the pommel (bottom edge of the grip) so that it’s in the middle of your breast plate. This puts it once again in a fixed and indexed position where the point of the blade will be facing the target. Whichever grip you end up accessing your blade in, just practice placing it in an indexed position.

You’re not looking to trade blows, this isn’t a boxing match.

When it’s all said and done, you need to understand that you’re not using the blade at distance to trade blows. You’re not looking to trade blows, this isn’t a boxing match. In part two, I’ll go over proper targeting in order to keep the target at distance. I’ll also go over simple tactics to start plugging in movement and ways to integrate the edge of the blade and not only the point. 


Article By Ian Strimbeck
Hand-to-Hand, Grappling, Edged Weapons
I am constantly evolving how I teach so as to bring the best knowledge to my students which will therefore allow them to be better able to answer the call if violence is the only option.

Comments